The answer is yes, but it’s bigger than Twerking at brunch

Brown Buns. Get it?
Brown Buns. Get it?
Photo by Cesar Carlevarino Aragon on Unsplash

Black Twitter has been beside itself all week. Chet Hanks went full Jafaican on Clubhouse and Obama (un)surprisingly denounced “defund the police.” But the uproar started when video footage of a Dallas restaurateur berating customers about twerking in his establishment went public.

Kevin Kelley, owner of TRUE Kitchen and Kocktails, says he asked three separate tables — occupied by female diners — more than once to cease dancing. Kelley added that patrons were also standing atop restaurant furniture and pressing their hands onto his window glass. (I’d assume those hands were not spotless.) Despite the owner’s pleas, the performances continued until the straw snapped the camel’s spine. Kelley went off, addressing the entire restaurant, in an indignant manner, letting it be known that TRUE Kitchen and Kocktails did not condone “twerking and shit.” His reasoning was that 75% of his customers are female and he didn’t feel he could ask men to carry themselves in a respectable fashion if the women were behaving licentiously. …


The comedic giant’s streaming beef echoes the disenfranchised and challenges the privileged. Where do you stand?

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Photo courtesy of Netflix

What separates Dave Chappelle apart from his peers travels further than him being today’s #1 comedian. Yes, he writes and performs stand up better than 98% of the human race. And yes his POV beams so brilliant that at times society gets introduced to undiscovered angles of itself. But the creator of the Chappelle’s Show no longer needs jokes to captivate an audience.

Today, Dave Chappelle stands as one of our generation’s greatest storytellers. Like a 1973 Bordeaux, his skill for crocheting hilarious details into luminously poignant tales has aged exquisitely whilst refining consumers. He has the command to make us hold our breath for eight minutes and forty six seconds as he reps for George Floyd. He can stalk a stage being as entertained by his own material as us or sit hunched on a stool for 60 minutes. …


Apple purchased rappers Gucci Mane and Jeezys’ deadly beef in exchange for millions of streams. Unfortunately, a resolution was never part of the deal

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Complex.com

Never before have two platinum-certified music artists weaponized their catalogs to settle a personal beef. Especially not a feud consisting of verbal disrespect, threats and death.

Last Thursday, rappers Gucci Mane and Young Jeezy faced off — in person — for the season 2 premiere of the scorching tale-of-the-tape series Verzuz. Millions of Apple TV and Instagram faithful witnessed this once unforeseeable moment in hip-hop history virtually. Worth the price of admission alone (actually, it was free — you were simply requested to pay attention) was the sight of two sworn enemies occupying the same room. In a promo interview leading up to the event, Jeezy was asked by a reporter if it was possible that the showdown could transpire without “an incident.” …


Thousands of African Americans really wanted a second term for one of history’s most racist presidents

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Photo: Icon Sportswire/Getty Images

There is a branch of Islam referred to as the Five Percent Nation. Its name derives from the belief that the world population is broken down into three percentages. Eighty-five percent of people are ignorant to the evil of the world in which they live and the fact that the original man is the Black man. The 5% — the Five Percenters — know the truth within and around themselves and aim to “civilize” the 85% with education. Then there’s the remaining 10% of the population. …


After four years of tyrannical and scandalous leadership, half the nation asked for a repeat. I learned a lot about my country.

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milwaukeeindependent.com

I needed no more evidence that the United States was its own antonym. Nor that this country is an old oak with rotted roots of racism. What I didn’t possess strong knowledge of was it being possibly more misogynistic than racist. 2016 taught me that. Americans had to grin and bear a biracial president in the White House for eight years. A whole woman sitting on the throne appeared to take national progression a bit too far. Clearly, the U.S.A. preferred a novice at the helm. Oh, and not just any novice — a crude, inarticulate former reality TV star with Twitter thumbs. …


An anti-racism mural goes up in Brooklyn. Three days later, it’s defaced. Take a wild guess who did it.

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Photo by Jose Cabaco

Last Friday afternoon, graphic artist Julian Alexander and creative producer Khadijat Oseni hosted a small curbside gathering at the Brooklyn Navy Yard. In attendance was a small collective consisting of various creatives from the intersecting worlds of art, media, fashion and advertising. All were present to watch the reveal of the latest mural installment for the Supremacy Project, a visual art campaign dedicated to articulating specific contextualizations of White supremacy.

The black-and-white mural consists primarily of a photo of the iconographic tribute to America’s founding fathers, Mount Rushmore. The intent of the photo selection is to remind onlookers of White supremacy’s original power brokers. Sprawled across the top half of the 19’ x 10’ piece is the word “Supremacy.” Its type face is an intentional hybrid of apparel and Hypebeast cult brand Supreme and the CVS pharmacy logo. A closer look reveals soaring military fighter jets. This particular detail takes aim at Donald Trump’s audacity (last July 4th, he hosted a rally at Mount Rushmore, where he had Blue Angel jets fly above during his speech), while bringing full circle the historic complicity of the POTUS. With Friday sandwiched between the last presidential debate and the first day of early voting in New York, Alexander felt there was no better day to unveil his latest “conversation starter.” …


‘Lovecraft Country’ Reminded Me Just How Much Basic White Men Ascend Off The Backs Of Blacks

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Photo by Kelsey McEuen

Last Sunday, I watched the bittersweet finale of HBO’s spectacular series Lovecraft Country. What does anyone with a fine palette for television do after the richest African-American-rooted show to ever grace television concludes? Obviously, circle back to episode one and rewatch the entire season. What I love most about Lovecraft (aside from the villain in every episode being White supremacy) was how the writers wove African-American nonfiction into each plot. From the vile reaction to Black residents in Chicago’s Cicero suburb (1951) to the stench of Emmett Till’s funeral to the pillaging of Tulsa in 1921, we were constantly reminded and informed of the Black experience’s beautiful, bad, and ugly. It was during a third watch of episode 3 (“Holy Ghost”) when I slid down a particularly dark and gruesome rabbit hole. …


Trump’s Supreme Court nom described her adopted children and it was frightening

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Photo by Annie Spratt on Unsplash

On the first day of Amy Coney Barrett’s Senate Confirmation hearings to replace Ruth Bader Ginsburg on the Supreme Court, she opened up not as a Circuit Court judge but as a mother. Instead of rationalizing her abortion stance or explaining why she feels climate control is more a policy matter than science, she spoke with vivid pride about her and husband Jesse’s seven children.

She began by informing that her oldest, Emma, to which Amy has referred to as “the first apple of our eye,” is a college sophomore who will possibly follow her parents footsteps in law. The judge continued, noting that her second oldest, 16-year-old Vivian, was born in Haiti and adopted by the Barrett’s in 2005. Amy made it a point to punctuate that when Vivian joined the family at 14 months old, she was so weak that doctors said “she may never walk or talk normally.” Today, Vivian is a high school track star, who, according to her esteemed legal guardian, no longer has trouble speaking. Which of Vivian’s abilities is her mother most proud? …


I dreamt that the Donald was so COVID sick his prayers got answered, literally

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MANDEL NGAN/AFP via Getty Images

My Child-

I know you are in great pain. Although I have welcomed the coronavirus into your body, the hurt you feel can be most attributed to the collision between your ego and karma. For you to receive COVID-19 was always the plan. Initially, I was to infect you last winter, at the onset of the pandemic. The postponement was inspired by a consideration for the millions of my American children. I saw this year as an opportunity for many to become informed by my finest gift to you: free reign. You persevered through three-fourths of your presidential term primarily under scandal — a rare feat. Nested within 2020 was another of my customized offerings: your greatest opportunity to rise as both a commander and a chief. So I spared you and sacrificed others — many of whom were in pain and at the end of their cycle. The intended number of casualties was never 200,000. …


As the summer faded, so did White allyship

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Photo by Barnabas Crosby

Honestly, I tried to not write about Breonna Taylor. My resistance wasn’t rooted so much in my exhaustion with the exoneration of her killers (or just how fucking egregious American racism remains). I wasn’t confident that I could sidestep my own emotions and add vegetables to the conversation or balm atop the fresh pain. Once again, we were back-smacked across the face and told to run along — and we bet’ not cry too loud ‘for we meet the other open palm. This isn’t me being dramatic. America isn’t tending to the victims who are bruised and scarred and inconsolable about Breonna Taylor’s judicial travesty; instead, it’s threatening them. In Kentucky and Illinois, the national guard is on deck for anyone who decides to cry out loud and aggressively. …

About

Bonsu Thompson

Bonsu Thompson is a writer, producer, Brooklynite and 2019 Sundance Screenwriters Lab fellow.

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